Salons criticise government’s ‘sexist’ reopening guidelines

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Getty Images

From Monday 13 July, beauty salons in England have been permitted to reopen, along with tattoo parlours, tanning shops, and nail bars. While this is welcome news for the estimated 41,000 salons across the country, they still face regulations on what they are able to offer customers; including an all-out ban on most treatments involving the face.

Salons have been told that treatments involving the face are still too dangerous due to the increased risk of spreading Covid-19 between workers and customers. This is because splashes and droplets from the nose and mouth could be easily transmitted from one person to another. Although workers understand the science, they have criticised the details of the plan as “sexist” because the list of permissible treatments deem a beard trim safe, but eyebrow threading unsafe, when both require close proximity.

The discrepancy has sparked outrage in the beauty industry.

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3 Signs You’re Not Exfoliating Enough If You’re Over 40

Exfoliating is an essential step in any skincare routine. It sloughs off dead skin cells and unclogs pores while leaving your skin fresh and glowy. You could be using the nicest skincare products in the world, but if you’re not exfoliating on the regular, those fancy serums, creams, etc. might not be living up to their potential because you’ve got a lot of dead skin cell buildup.

Not to mention, starting your exfoliating routine early will have your future self thanking you. “Exfoliating young skin serves mostly to keep skin glowing and blemish-free,” says Suneel Chilukuri, MD, of Refresh Dermatology. “As a teenager and young adult, your body naturally has more cellular turnover and often greater sebum production. Natural cell turnover slows with age, which results in pigmentary changes (sun spots), fine lines, and dryness. Some would say exfoliating becomes even more important at this stage to keep stimulate new

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How spas will look when they reopen after lockdown

Getty Images/iStockphoto
Getty Images/iStockphoto

After months of lockdown spent juggling working from home with parenting, health concerns and financial woes, many of us have been left feeling anxious, fatigued and highly strung.

If there was ever a time for self-care it is now. The ultimate spa experience is something many of us are desperate to indulge in, with our sunlight-starved skin and poor posture longing to be pacified by the hands of a professional while surrounded by lavender scented spritzes and soft music.

Just like hairdressers and beauty salons, all spas have been closed since Boris Johnson imposed a nationwide lockdown on 23 March. Now, the government has announced that spas will be allowed to open as early as next week, with Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden announcing on Thursday that beauty salons can resume business as of 13 July.

The date for the grand reopening of personal care establishments was subject

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Who’s To Blame For The Failure Of The Girlboss Dream?

(Photo: Illustration: HuffPost; Photos: Penguin Random House)
(Photo: Illustration: HuffPost; Photos: Penguin Random House)

There’s something rotten at The Wing, a once-vaunted feminist company that sought to offer women and non-binary people a safe alternative to bro-y coworking spaces. Founder Audrey Gelman stepped down as CEO recently after Black and brown employees went public with claims that the company was riddled with racism and mistreated employees of color.

And it’s not just bad there; it’s all the gleaming corporate feminist utopias we’ve imagined, each hiding an ugly, festering thing behind millennial-pink walls and marble accent tables. The promise of safety has been betrayed, a crime committed, a creeping bloodstain left to darken the bamboo floorboards. Someone must pay.

Just as a slew of supposedly feminist companies, from The Wing to Refinery29, have faced reckonings over abusive and racist office cultures, the girlbosses are toppling in fiction as well. Two scathing and propulsive 2020 novels — “Self Care,”

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